Are You a Life Procrastinator? Here’s How to Tell

Life procrastination is what I call voluntarily putting off something you truly want to do, despite knowing that you’ll probably be worse off because of the delay. Here’s how to fix it.

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Many People Would Rather Do THIS Than Be Alone With Their Thoughts

Some people would rather do anything — even hurt themselves — than spend quiet time with their own thoughts, a new study finds.

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Docs Uncomfortable Judging Patients’ Competency to Carry Guns

Some U.S. jurisdictions are now requiring a doctor’s OK for people to carry a concealed gun, but a new survey suggests many doctors aren’t comfortable with that role.

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Are You SURE You’re Not Overweight?

Turns out some people are pretty out of touch when it comes to their weight.

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How Procrastination Is Messing With Your Sleep

Whether you’re a night owl or an early riser, sometimes it can be hard to stick to your bedtime. But researchers say it’s making you miserable.

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Boston Marathon Bombings Left Psychological Scars on Kids

Children who witnessed the bombings at the Boston Marathon were six times more likely to develop symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than those who didn’t see the attack, new research shows.

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Brain Scans May Support Venus/Mars Divide Between Sexes

While not every woman is intuitive or every man handy with tools, neurological scans of young males and females suggest that — on average — their brains really do develop differently.

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Snubbed? Brain Chemicals Might Comfort You

Your brain releases natural painkillers when you’re rejected by other people, according to a new study. That this painkiller system acts to ease social hurt as well as physical pain may improve understanding of depression and social anxiety, the University of Michigan Medical School researchers said.

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Friend or Lover? Your Voice May Give You Away

Your voice can reveal whether the person you’re talking to is a lover or a friend, a new study suggests. The sound of people’s voices is different when speaking to romantic partners compared to buddies, and such variations could potentially be used to detect infidelity, according to study author Susan Hughes, an associate professor of psychology at Albright College in Reading, Pa.

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Literature Lovers May ‘Read’ Other People Better

Reading award-winning literature may boost your ability to read other people, too, a new study suggests. Researchers found that when they had volunteers read works of acclaimed “literary fiction,” it seemed to temporarily improve their ability to interpret other people’s emotions. The same was not true of nonfiction or “popular” fiction — the mystery, romance and science-fiction books that often dominate best-seller lists.

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