FDA Approves First Under-the-Tongue Hay Fever Pill

Just in time for the spring allergy season, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a new under-the-tongue pill to treat hay fever caused by certain grass pollens.

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Suffer From Allergies? Don’t Blame Where You Live

Wherever you live in the United States, allergy rates are mostly the same, but young children in southern states are more likely to suffer allergies than their peers in other places.

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Gradual Exposure to Peanuts May Help Some Allergic Kids

A new type of treatment for children and teens with peanut allergies might be a step closer to becoming a reality. Oral immunotherapy, which involves eating small amounts of peanut protein, may help build up a tolerance to peanuts, according to a preliminary study from England.

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Eating Nuts During Pregnancy Might Help Prevent Allergies in Kids

Women who eat nuts during pregnancy — and who aren’t allergic themselves — are less likely to have kids with nut allergies, a new study suggests.

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Dogs May Guard Babies Against Asthma, Allergies

Researchers say they’ve discovered why infants who live in homes with a dog are less likely to develop asthma and allergies later in childhood. The team conducted experiments with mice and found that exposing them to dust from homes where dogs live triggered changes in the community of microbes that live in the infant’s gut and reduced immune system response to common allergens.

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Pollen Allergies May Be Linked to Blood Cancer Risk

Women with pollen allergies may be at increased risk for blood cancers such as leukemia and lymphoma, a new study suggests. Researchers did not uncover the same link in men. This suggests there is something unique in women that causes chronic allergy-related stimulation of the immune system to increase vulnerability to the development of blood cancers, the study authors said.

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Halloween Safety Tips for Kids With Food Allergies

Halloween activities, such as parties and trick-or-treating, could be dangerous for children with food allergies, a medical expert warns. Even mild food allergies that result in watery eyes or a rash could become more severe after a child is re-exposed to an allergen, said Dr. Joyce Rabbat, a pediatric allergy specialist with the Loyola University Health System, in Chicago.

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Is It a Cold, Allergies, or a Sinus Problem?

Got a cold? If you have a stuffy nose, runny eyes, and other symptoms, you might think so. But it could also be due to allergies or even sinus infection, which you would treat differently than a cold. If you’re not sure, pin this handy guide to your Pinterest page, for quick and easy reference.

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Costs for Kids’ Food Allergies Estimated at Nearly $25 Billion

Childhood food allergies cost the United States about $25 billion a year in medical fees, lost work productivity and family expenses, according to a new study.

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Summer Cold? How to Tell If It’s Really Allergies

Sneezing, watery eyes, scratchy throat? What you think is a summer cold may actually be allergies, an expert says.”Contrary to popular belief, seasonal allergies don’t only strike in the spring and fall months,” Dr. Richard Weber, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI)

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