Health Editor
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Too Few Teens Receive HPV Shot, CDC Says

By Steven ReinbergHealthDay Reporter
THURSDAY, July 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) — An “unacceptably low” number of girls and boys are getting the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, which protects against cervical, anal and other cancers, U.S. health officials said Thursday.
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends all boys and girls aged 11 and 12 get [...]

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Farmers’ Market Vouchers May Help Poorer Families Eat Healthier

THURSDAY, July 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) — Giving low-income families vouchers to buy fruits and vegetables at farmers’ markets could increase their consumption of these healthy foods, according to a new study.
Low-income families tend to eat fewer fruits and vegetables. In addition to not having adequate access to healthy foods, cost is also an issue. [...]

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Bacteria in Semen May Affect HIV Transmission, Levels: Study

THURSDAY, July 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) — Human semen is naturally colonized by bacteria, and a new study suggests the microbes might have a role to play in both HIV transmission and levels in infected men.
U.S. researchers found that bacteria in semen — the “microbiome” — play a role in local inflammation and in the [...]

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FDA Approves Hard-to-Abuse Narcotic Painkiller

THURSDAY, July 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) — A new formulation of a powerful narcotic painkiller that discourages potential abusers from snorting or injecting the drug has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
Called Targiniq ER and made by Purdue Pharma, the pill is a combination of the narcotic oxycodone and naloxone, a drug [...]

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Teenage Boys Want Intimacy, Not Just Sex, Survey Finds

By Amy NortonHealthDay Reporter
THURSDAY, July 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) — The stereotype of the sex-crazed teenage boy may be dead wrong, according to a small study that asked boys what they really want from romantic relationships.
In interviews with 33 boys between the ages of 14 and 16, researchers found that most said they wanted a [...]

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Painful, Itchy Patches Could Be a Sign of Skin Cancer

Painful or itchy skin lesions could be a warning sign of skin cancer, researchers report.

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Dogs Can Get Jealous Too, According to This Adorable Study

Jealousy may not be the sole domain of humans, with new research showing dogs can get downright possessive when it comes to the love of their master.

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Acetaminophen May Not Help Back Pain After All

Even though its use is often advised by doctors, the painkiller acetaminophen — best known as Tylenol — does not help treat lower back pain, according to a new Australian study.

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More Than 10 Million People Gained Coverage Under Obamacare, Study Finds

THURSDAY, July 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) — A new study estimates that more than 10 million uninsured Americans gained health coverage over the past year due to the Affordable Care Act.
The biggest gains came in states that expanded eligibility for Medicaid, the federal insurance program for the poor. Under health care reform, popularly known as [...]

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Parents of Obese Kids Often View Them as Healthy

By Kathleen DohenyHealthDay Reporter
THURSDAY, July 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) — Parents of obese children often don’t view their kids as unhealthy or recognize the health consequences of excess weight or inactivity, according to a new study.
The children of the families surveyed for the new research were attending an obesity clinic at the Hasbro Children’s Hospital [...]

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Many Kids With Medicaid Use ER as Doctor’s Office: CDC

By Steven ReinbergHealthDay Reporter
THURSDAY, July 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) — Children covered by Medicaid, the publicly funded insurance program for the poor, visit the emergency room for medical care far more often than uninsured or privately insured youngsters, a U.S. survey finds.
And kids with Medicaid were more likely than those with private insurance to visit [...]

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Young Readers, Tomorrow’s Leaders?

THURSDAY, July 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) — Young children with strong reading skills may be on a fast track to a brighter future, a new study suggests.
Kids with above average reading skills may have higher intelligence levels as they get older, according to British researchers.
The study included 1,890 identical twins from Great Britain who were [...]

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Good Odds for Those Who Need Bone Marrow Donor, Study Finds

By Dennis ThompsonHealthDay Reporter
WEDNESDAY, July 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) — Most blood cancer patients in the United States who need a bone marrow transplant can find an acceptable match through the National Marrow Donor Program, a new study has determined.
Depending on a patient’s race or ethnic background, the study found that 66 percent to 97 [...]

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Many U.S. Male Soldiers Had Troubled Childhoods, Study Finds

By Alan MozesHealthDay Reporter
WEDNESDAY, July 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) — U.S. servicemen are more likely to have been exposed to some form of childhood trauma than their civilian counterparts, a large, new survey suggests.
The finding seems to apply solely to military men, not women.
The research team suggested that the finding could be a cause for [...]

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Routine Pulse Check May Prevent Second Stroke, Study Says

WEDNESDAY, July 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) — Regularly checking the pulse of a stroke survivor may help prevent another stroke, researchers report.
“Screening pulse is the method of choice for checking for irregular heartbeat for people over age 65 who have never had a stroke. Our study shows it may be a safe, effective, noninvasive and [...]

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Cystic Fibrosis Drug Combo May Be Less Effective Than Hoped

By Randy DotingaHealthDay Reporter
WEDNESDAY, July 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) — A powerful drug combo may not be as effective against cystic fibrosis as previously thought. New lab research on human cells suggests that one of the medications might stop the other from working properly.
However, this study’s findings aren’t definitive, and there’s still hope for the [...]

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Gene Study Gives New Insight Into Puberty in Girls

By Amy NortonHealthDay Reporter
WEDNESDAY, July 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) — The timing of a girl’s first menstrual period may be determined by hundreds, and possibly thousands, of gene variations, a new study suggests.
Researchers have identified over 100 regions of DNA that are connected to the timing of menarche — a woman’s first menstrual period. The [...]

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